How to overcome self-doubt

If you’ve ever experienced self-doubt, here’s a technique that quickly shifts your emotional state — emotional freedom technique (EFT).

Self-doubt holds us back from living the life we want.

I interviewed Brad Yates, emotional freedom technique practitioner, and you can tap along with us as he takes me through a round of tapping to remove an old belief about not being worthy.

Brad Yates is an emotional freedom technique (EFT) practitioner who has more than 600 free videos on Youtube that can help you move through a variety of common stressful thoughts and beliefs.

Interview Transcript

Sherold:  Welcome, everyone. I’m Sherold Barr from SheroldBarr.com. Today, I have a special guest. I’m thrilled to introduce you to Brad Yates. Brad is an Emotional Freedom Technique Practitioner and someone that I’ve admired from afar online. I absolutely love his videos.

Brad teaches everyone from elite athletes to CEOs and actors and people struggling with addictions how to master their emotions. He uses what we call the Emotional Freedom Technique — it’s also known as EFT — to help people overcome fear and stress to improve their live. I love the fact, Brad, that you graduated from Ringling Brothers, Barnum and Bailey Clown College. That is so awesome.

One of the things I told you off camera here before we started was that I work with women entrepreneurs who are starting businesses. This business I’m in now is my second business, and I’ve been doing this since 1996.

I love this quote by Anne Lamott:

“My mind is like a bad neighborhood that I don’t want to go into alone.”  

A lot of the work I do with my clients is helping them with self-doubt and fear. I’m into excavating the beliefs underneath a lot of our limiting thoughts and beliefs. That’s the reason I wanted to have you on.

Let’s start off with, “What is EFT?”

Brad:  First of all, thank you for having me on. I’m always grateful for the opportunity to share this work with folks who may not be familiar with it or are just getting started with it.

Especially clearing out those limiting beliefs that stop us from being who we can be and sharing what we can share to make the world a better place.

EFT — also commonly known as Tapping. A lot of people just hear Tapping. It’s a process originally based on acupuncture. For thousands of years in Chinese medicine, they said there’s a flow of energy through pathways, called meridians, flowing along the body.

When this energy is flowing naturally, we experience our natural state of well-being, physically and emotionally. When the energy gets stuck, we don’t feel so good and we don’t think so well and we don’t make the best choices and all kinds of unfortunate consequences.

In traditional acupuncture, they would stick needles in key points to stimulate the healthy flow of energy. With EFT, we’re just tapping with our fingertips.

We even have modern research showing that it dramatically lowers stress. We can see cortisol — which is one of the stress hormones — is reduced when we’re doing the tapping and most, if not all, issues — both physical and emotional — have at least some element of stress related.

That’s why we find that the tapping can be beneficial in so many different areas of life because we’re dramatically reducing the stress involved.

Sherold:   I always say try EFT because it’s fast if you’re in a stressful situation.

How does EFT help people with limiting beliefs? In the work we do, there’s universal beliefs and these are — I like to use the metaphor of data farms. Those universal beliefs live over there in those data farms and we’re all just, depending on the day, picking one. It could be, “Who do you think you are to do XYZ,” which means showing up. Or, “I’m not good enough,” or any flavor of that. “I’m not thin enough, rich enough, expert enough, smart enough,” whatever enough. That goes the gamut.

How would EFT help with those beliefs when they come up?

Brad: Well, we pick these things up from experiences in our childhood mostly. I like to refer to what I call the Michelangelo Process because Michelangelo said, ‘The statues were already there perfect inside the marble. I just have to chip away what doesn’t belong to reveal the magnificence inside.

Sherold: I love that.

Brad:  To me, that’s how I look at people. The magnificence is already in there. There’s all this extra marble, the beliefs of, “I’m not good enough. I’m not worthy. I’m not smart enough. I have guilt. I have shame,” and things like that. Those are there to protect us. All the issues that we have are there to keep us safe. We pick things up in our childhood.

Either we’re told by somebody who can’t see the true that we’re not good enough. Someone may say, “Who do you think you are trying to achieve this? You’ll never be worth anything.”

That’s for people who have some serious issues going on. They may even think that they’re helping us. Whether it’s a parent or a teacher or someone else trying to say, “You know what? Don’t go into life thinking that you’re good and things are going to happen to you because you’re going to be disappointed. Let’s just deal with it up front that you’re not going to be worth anything.” They may even think that they’re doing us a favor. Really twisted thinking, but that’s the best they can do.

People are always doing the best they can at any given moment.

Sherold:  I believe that, too.

Brad:  Based on the circumstances and based on their programming. Happy, healthy people don’t say those things, but a lot of people are not trained to be happy, healthy people.

We take on these beliefs, these ideas, either from someone saying to us we’re not good enough or in our young mind making that decision.

We’re giving an oral report in the third grade and we trip over our words and everybody laughs at us and something says, “People don’t like me. I’m not worthy of respect. I’m not good enough,” so we make that decision at a very young age.

When we have a really important decision to make — like we’re going to buy a house and we’re looking at a couple different houses — how often to do we say, “I think I’ll go down to the kindergarten and I’ll get a couple of six year olds together and I’ll ask them what they think I should do. I’ll take my stock portfolio and ask them what they think I should invest in.” It’s like, “No, that’s crazy. Why would I ask a six year old for advice,” but you do it all the time.

Sherold:  That’s a great analogy. I love that.

Brad:  We’re asking ourselves, “Should I apply for that job? Should I go up and ask that person out on a date? Should I do this?” It’s like, “Are you kidding?” No, no, no, no. That six year old inside that says it’s not safe. We’re trying to protect ourselves so fear and stress comes up when we try to do that.

Even when we try to say, “I am good enough,” depending on how long we’ve been holding this belief that we’re not good enough, trying to change that is stressful.

The amygdala and our midbrain starts to react and go, “Oh! Danger!” the same way it would have reacted 100,000 years ago if there was a sabretooth tiger in the area. It’s still, “Freak out! Freeze!” We’re not able to make clear choices, we’re not able to make good decisions and we retreat into our comfort zone.

We may go and look for a drug of choice — a cigarette or chocolate or something like that — that numbs us out and makes us just settle down and wait until this feeling that you want to change passes. Then we go back to life as we understand it. What we expect.

Part of us says, “It might be crap, but it’s my crap. I know where it is. I know how to deal with it.” That’s what happens. When we try to make a change, when we try to look at things in a different way and we try to look at ourselves in a different way, we experience stress because it doesn’t feel safe.

With the tapping, we’re calming down the stress response, that fear response, so that if I say, “I am good enough to apply for that job,” or whatever it might be, part of me might be going, “No. No!” But, as I tap along, I start to recognize, “Wait a minute. Why am I thinking that I’m not okay?

Remember that thing that happened in the third grade? Remember what mom said when you were five?” We start to realize that didn’t mean I wasn’t good enough. Mom was in a bad mood. I messed up on a word. Kids laughed. Kids laugh. I’ve laughed at other people. It didn’t mean they weren’t good enough.

We start to recognize that these aren’t truths. To me, that’s where we’re chipping away excess marble and we’re getting to that place where we know inside, instinctively, “I’m a magnificent child of the universe. Of course I’m good enough.”

Sherold:  These are the thoughts — everything you just mentioned — that stops people from doing what they really desire to do and maybe what they’re here for: using their gifts and talents. That’s why I love your work. Like I said, it’s amazing the scope of what you’ve got up there now, which is pretty awesome.

How would somebody start? If they have this limiting belief or fear, how do they pick the setup phase and, then… I know we do the karate chop and work on that. Can you explain, break it down and then maybe we can have you demo it?

Brad: When we’re doing tapping, it’s great if we can be very specific. If we can look back and remember something like, “Oh, that time in the third grade where everybody laughed at me.”

Sherold: Oh, I have one we can do. When I was about six and introduced in my first play — I was a lady in waiting — all of the little kids went one by one in front of the big blue velvet curtain. When I went out there, by brother got all of his friends to boo.

Brad:  Your mind decided this is not a safe situation. This was really painful.

Sherold: I wanted to disappear. Yeah.

Brad:  This isn’t something that’s bad or stupid. This is a survival mechanism. If we’re a kid and we go up and touch a hot burner on the stove, we feel pain and something in us says, “Lesson learned. Don’t do that again,” which is a good thing. We don’t want to have to every time we go into the kitchen go, “The burner’s red. I wonder if it will hurt this time.”

We have to learn things quickly because if we had to sit there and figure things out all the time, then we couldn’t function.

You went up there, you went out, experienced pain and part of you said, “All right. Don’t do this again.” We just file it away so that even before you’re up there and can ask, “Is it safe?” your mind is going, “There’s an opportunity to be on stage. Hey! Look over there. There’s a sale on aisle five! Go check that out.”

Sherold:   Let’s go shopping instead.

Brad: Exactly. It happens so fast that we’re not even aware that there’s an opportunity that I was going to miss over there. It’s happening quickly and at a level totally designed to protect us. It’s great when you can remember a particular event like that. Not everyone remembers these events. They’re just aware of, “I’m not doing what I want to do. I’m holding myself back.”

If you ask someone, “Close your eyes and take a deep breath. Imagine doing what you want to do.” Say it’s public speaking. Say, “Imagine being on stage and out there in front of people. What do you feel? On a scale from zero to 10, how much anxiety comes up? What are you feeling physically?”

They may not have a recollection — a conscious recollection — of when they decided this was dangerous. But they can tell what they feel right now, so we’ll tap on what they’re feeling in that moment and we’ll start there.

In the process of tapping, it’s like peeling layers of an onion. We’re going through and all this anxiety, all this anxiety, “Oh, my goodness. I remember when I was in the sixth grade and I went in front of everybody and my brother had everybody boo.”

Sherold:  Wow

Brad:  We’ve locked that away because it’s not safe to remember what that is. Part of us wants to block us from even figuring it out because it’s like, “Look. This has gotten us this far. We’re still alive, so if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. Why do you want to go messing with anything if you’re still alive? We’re surviving. We’re doing what we’re meant to do.” That part is going to say, “You don’t need to see that stuff that’s back there. Pay no attention to the events behind the curtain.” If we go looking, we’ll often fell stress, so that’s why I’ll say if you’re not sure what it is now, let’s just start tapping anyway because as you’re tapping, you’re going to start to clear the fear and you’re going to feel safer remembering what might have gone on.

Sherold:  Right.

Brad:  Then I’ll give suggestions as we’re tapping for allowing yourself to be aware of what those events were or simply clearing the fear sight unseen. Sometimes we don’t need to know what the event was. It’s like you have your trashcan in the kitchen and you throw stuff in there and then you take the bag at the end of the week and you go and you drop it in the big garbage can. Very few of us go out there and say, “Let’s review what this week’s trash is. Here’s the milk carton I finished off yesterday. Here’s the egg carton from a few days ago.” We don’t have to know it all. We just drop it and clear it.

Sometimes we need to know for our highest good and sometimes we just let it go such that being on stage and they’re like, “I feel fine. This is actually pretty cool. I like the idea of being in front of people. I like the idea of being able to share what I have to share.” We become more aware of the fact that you are good enough and you have something to offer and you’re excited about sharing that.

Sherold:      I love that.

Brad:  When you think about this event where your brother’s friends all booed you, is there still emotion coming up around that?

Sherold: You know, it’s interesting. It came up when I was in Master Coach Training because I noticed performance anxiety. I think it comes up as subtle performance anxiety. It could be I’m going to offer a program and what if people don’t show up? It’s very subtle.

Back to this, I do feel performance anxiety if I’m — this was a coaching marathon where people were pulled off and on to coach. It floated up that night. I hadn’t been aware of this thought and then it just appeared and came to me. I was conscious of it. It was really interesting that it came up from a pressure situation.

Brad: Let’s do it, Sherold. Go ahead and close your eyes and take a deep breath.

Anyone watching, you can go ahead and go through this too and think about any events that comes to mind that might cause limiting beliefs.

Thinking back to this time crossing in front of the blue curtain. Just follow your breath through your body. Check in with yourself. Notice what you feel physically and notice what you feel emotionally. Just allow yourself to be aware — without judgement because there’s no right or wrong here. Just without judgement allowing yourself to be aware of any discomfort, any anxiety, any fear, anything that’s coming up. Write down on a scale of zero to 10 — 10 being, “Oh, my God. I’m still freaking out about that.”

Sherold: I feel a physical sensation on my shoulders and back. I got into the place of being that little girl and I was frozen and it was very anxious. I would say when I can go back there, an eight. I would say that’s pretty… it’s still there.

Brad: Interesting. This happens a lot. If I had a nickel for every time something comes up and someone will say, “I had this argument with my dad, but I’ve done a lot of work on this so I’m done with it.” We’ll start tapping and sometimes they’ll break down in tears. It’s like, maybe not

It’s not that the work you haven’t done isn’t effective. There are elements that we allow ourselves to go, “Okay, that’s enough.” It keeps us safe.

Sherold: I think that it’s subtle. I can go on stage, I can do all that. I think it’s more, like I said, I sense it when I’m creating something and I’m about to put it out in the world. I call it performance anxiety.  Yes, let’s work it. Let’s see what we can do.

Brad: What I’m going to do is I’m going to do a more generalized wording, but I want you to keep that in mind. For anybody else who chooses to go through this with us, keep in mind whatever events might have come up for you. I’ll do some fairly general wording so that it will cover a lot of things. But, as you keep in mind that particular event, then the clearing work will be beneficial in that.

I’ll just tap you through the points and, Sherold, if you’ll repeat back the phrases after me.

Everyone watching, just go ahead and do what I do and repeat back. A quick caveat here: Because we’re dealing with emotional stuff, if you’re going to clean your living your and it looks pretty clean. But then you move the rug and you find, “I’ve been sweeping dirt under the rug for a while.” Suddenly, it looks worse. As you start cleaning, it suddenly looks worse than it did before.

That can happen with tapping. We’re dealing with emotional stuff. You may be thinking, “I’m feeling fine,” but just like this where I’ve said think about it and all of a sudden this anxiety of level eight comes up that hadn’t been there because you’re lifting the rug and looking underneath.

For everyone watching, if you suspect that maybe you’ve been sweeping barrels of toxic waste under there and maybe you’re going through a really tough time and there’s a lot of emotional stuff, lifting the rug right now without anyone there for emotional support might not be a good idea. You might want to take that into consideration. Maybe you can consider working with a professional.

If you choose to tap along, you must take full responsibility for your own wellbeing. It’s a safe process in general. I’ve never had that experience where anyone was like, “Oh, no. I was watching this interview with Brad and it totally freaked me out.” But you never know.

That being said, everyone close your eyes and take a deep breath. Say, “I’m good enough.”

Sherold:  I’m good enough.

Brad:  Especially in thinking about something you’d like to do that you maybe struggle with. Are you putting yourself out there on the internet? On stage? Whatever it is.

Just rate that on a scale of zero to 10 — 10 being, “Of course I’m good enough.” To the extent that there’s not a 10, then don’t judge yourself harshly. If it’s a two, that doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with you. It just means that you’ve got a lot of beliefs about why it wouldn’t be safe.

If you’re aware of particular events like this blue curtain event, then just bring that to mind.

Now, I’m tapping on the side of my hand.

Even though I sometimes doubt I’m good enough.

Sherold:      Even though I sometimes doubt I’m good enough.

Brad:          I chose to love and accept myself anyway.

Sherold:      I choose to love and accept myself anyway.

Brad:          Even though I sometimes doubt I’m good enough.

Sherold:      Even though I sometimes doubt I’m good enough.

Brad:          I choose to love and honor myself anyway.

Sherold:      I choose to love and honor myself anyway.

Brad:          Even though I sometimes doubt I’m good enough.

Sherold:      Even though I sometimes doubt I’m good enough.

Brad:          And it makes me afraid to put myself out there.

Sherold:      And it makes me afraid to put myself out there.

Brad:          Because if I’m not good enough…

Sherold:      Because if I’m not good enough…

Brad:          There are going to be consequences.

Sherold:      There are going to be consequences.

Brad:          And they can be very painful.

Sherold:      And they can be very painful.

Brad:          And I want to protect myself.

Sherold:      And I want to protect myself.

Brad:          And part of me believes…

Sherold:      And part of me believes…

Brad:          That doubting my worthiness…

Sherold:      That doubting my worthiness…

Brad:          Keeps me safely in my comfort zone.

Sherold:      Keeps me safely in my comfort zone.

Brad:          Even though I sometimes doubt I’m good enough…

Sherold:      Even though I sometimes doubt I’m good enough…

Brad:          I choose to deeply and completely…

Sherold:      I choose to deeply and completely…

Brad:          Love, honor and accept myself…

Sherold:      Love, honor and accept myself…

Brad:          And maybe anyone else.

Sherold:      And maybe anyone else.

Brad:          Including my brother…

Sherold:      Including my brother…

Brad:          Who might be involved in these fears.

Sherold:      Who might be involved in these fears.

Brad:          All these doubts about being good enough…

Sherold:      All these doubts about being good enough…

Brad:          All these doubts about being good enough…

Sherold:      All these doubts about being good enough…

Brad:          All these fears that I might not be good enough…

Sherold:      All these fears that I might not be good enough…

Brad:          There may be a part of me…

Sherold:      There may be a part of me…

Brad:          Deep inside…

Sherold:      Deep inside…

Brad:          That knows that I’m plenty good enough.

Sherold:      That knows that I’m plenty good enough.

Brad:          About four inches below the armpit.

All these doubts…

Sherold:      All these doubts…

Brad:          That get in the way of knowing this…

Sherold:      That get in the way of knowing this…

Brad:          Maybe at one point in life…

Sherold:      Maybe at one point in life…

Brad:          I actually thought I was good enough.

Sherold:      I actually thought I was good enough.

Brad:          And then something happened.

Sherold:      And then something happened.

Brad:          I was told that I wasn’t good enough.

Sherold:      I was told that I wasn’t good enough.

Brad:          Or I went through some experience…

Sherold:      Or I went through some experience…

Brad:          And I decided I wasn’t good enough.

Sherold:      And I decided I wasn’t good enough.

Brad:          Not because I’m bad or stupid.

Sherold:      Not because I’m bad or stupid.

Brad:          But because I was trying to protect myself.

Sherold:     But because I was trying to protect myself.

Brad:          Something in me said…

Sherold:     Something in me said…

Brad:          This is dangerous.

Sherold:     This is dangerous.

Brad:          This is painful.

Sherold:     This is painful.

Brad:          I need to avoid this.

Sherold:     I need to avoid this.

Brad:          If I tell myself on I’m not good enough…

Sherold:     If I tell myself on I’m not good enough…

Brad:          Then I’ll keep myself safely in my comfort zone.

Sherold:     Then I’ll keep myself safely in my comfort zone.

Brad:          And I’ll avoid ever putting myself in this position.

Sherold:     And I’ll avoid ever putting myself in this position.

Brad:          Part of me thinks this is a really good plan.

Sherold:      Part of me thinks this is a really good plan.

Brad:          Part of me still thinks it’s a good plan.

Sherold:      Part of me still thinks it’s a good plan.

Brad:          I’m still here aren’t I?

Sherold:      I’m still here aren’t I?

Brad:          Apparently, it’s working.

Sherold:      Apparently, it’s working.

Brad:          Except I’m aware now…

Sherold:      Except I’m aware now…

Brad:          That this is holding me back.

Sherold:      That this is holding me back.

Brad:          It’s stopping me from doing things.

Sherold:      It’s stopping me from doing things.

Brad:          That I think I’d really like to do.

Sherold:      That I think I’d really like to do.

Brad:          And maybe I’ll still do them…

Sherold:      And maybe I’ll still do them…

Brad:          But I don’t enjoy them as much as I could.

Sherold:      But I don’t enjoy them as much as I could.

Brad:          I don’t do them as often as I might.

Sherold:      I don’t do them as often as I might.

Brad:          Without even knowing it…

Sherold:      Without even knowing it…

Brad:          I may be avoiding all kinds of opportunities.

Sherold:      I may be avoiding all kinds of opportunities.

Brad:          Not because I’m bad or stupid…

Sherold:      Not because I’m bad or stupid…

Brad:          But because I’m trying to protect myself.

Sherold:      But because I’m trying to protect myself.

Brad:          And I’m open to the possibility…

Sherold:      And I’m open to the possibility…

Brad:          That even though this might have worked in the past…

Sherold:      That even though this might have worked in the past…

Brad:          Maybe I don’t need it now.

Sherold:      Maybe I don’t need it now.

Brad:          Maybe I don’t need this fear anymore.

Sherold:      Maybe I don’t need this fear anymore.

Brad:          Maybe I don’t need this doubt anymore.

Sherold:      Maybe I don’t need this doubt anymore.

Brad:          It might be safe now…

Sherold:      It might be safe now…

Brad:          To begin to believe…

Sherold:      To begin to believe…

Brad:          That maybe I really am good enough.

Sherold:      That maybe I really am good enough.

Brad:          Maybe more than good enough.

Sherold:      Maybe more than good enough.

Brad:          Maybe it’s possible…

Sherold:      Maybe it’s possible…

Brad:          That I’m pretty freaking awesome.

Sherold:      That I’m pretty freaking awesome.

Brad:          And I should be shared with the world.

Sherold:      And I should be shared with the world.

Brad:          I can make the world a better place.

Sherold:      I can make the world a better place.

Brad:          I’m plenty good enough.

Sherold:      I’m plenty good enough.

Brad:          I’m clearing the doubts about that.

Sherold:      I’m clearing the doubts about that.

Brad:          Releasing any fear…

Sherold:      Releasing any fear…

Brad:          Of acknowledging how awesome I am…

Sherold:      Of acknowledging how awesome I am…

Brad:          And part of me might say…

Sherold:      And part of me might say…

Brad:          Oh don’t say that.

Sherold:      Oh, don’t say that.

Brad:          That’s bad.

Sherold:      That’s bad.

Brad:          People won’t like you if you say that.

Sherold:      People won’t like you if you say that.

Brad:          And you might put yourself out there…

Sherold:      And you might put yourself out there…

Brad:          And allow yourself to be seen…

Sherold:      And allow yourself to be seen…

Brad:          And that can cause pain.

Sherold:      And that can cause pain.

Brad:          All these reasons…

Sherold:      All these reasons…

Brad:          Why I couldn’t or shouldn’t put myself out there…

Sherold:      Why I couldn’t or shouldn’t put myself out there…

Brad:          I’m clearing these fears now.

Sherold:      I’m clearing these fears now.

Brad:          I’m clearing them at a cellular level.

Sherold:      I’m clearing them at a cellular level.

Brad:          And all the way back through my past.

Sherold:      And all the way back through my past.

Brad:          Back through all those events in my life…

Sherold:      Back through all those events in my life…

Brad:          Where I may have gotten the message…

Sherold:      Where I may have gotten the message…

Brad:          That I wasn’t good enough.

Sherold:      That I wasn’t good enough.

Brad:          That it wasn’t safe to believe I was good enough.

Sherold:      That it wasn’t safe to believe I was good enough.

Brad:          That it wasn’t safe to put myself out there.

Sherold:      That it wasn’t safe to put myself out there.

Brad:          I love and forgive that part of me…

Sherold:      I love and forgive that part of me…

Brad:          That made that decision…

Sherold:      That made that decision…

Brad:          And has been trying so hard…

Sherold:      And has been trying so hard…

Brad:          To keep me safe all these years.

Sherold:      To keep me safe all these years.

Brad:          I’m allowing myself to look at the past now…

Sherold:      I’m allowing myself to look at the past now…

Brad:          And see the truth.

Sherold:      And see the truth.

Brad:          Maybe what happened…

Sherold:      Maybe what happened…

Brad:          Isn’t really what I thought happened.

Sherold:      Isn’t really what I thought happened.

Brad:          Maybe it had nothing to do with me.

Sherold:      Maybe it had nothing to do with me.

Brad:          It had to do with someone’s bad sense of humor.

Sherold:      It had to do with someone’s bad sense of humor.

Brad:          Whether they were in a bad mood…

Sherold:      Whether they were in a bad mood…

Brad:          Or something else going on inside of them.

Sherold:      Or something else going on inside of them.

Brad:          And it didn’t mean anything about me.

Sherold:      And it didn’t mean anything about me.

Brad:          Because I’m awesome.

Sherold:      Because I’m awesome.

Brad:          And I was awesome back then.

Sherold:      And I was awesome back then.

Brad:          And I’m allowing myself to feel awesome.

Sherold:      And I’m allowing myself to feel awesome.

Brad:          In body, mind and spirit.

Sherold:      In body, mind and spirit.

Brad:          Take a deep breath.

Sherold:      Wow.

Brad:          Go ahead and close your eyes again and think and say again, “I’m good enough.”

Sherold:      I’m good enough.

Brad:         If you can, if there was a certain event that you were remembering, allow yourself to bring that to mind. Sherold, go ahead and think of yourself as that little girl walking in front of the blue curtain. If the anxiety was at an eight before, what does it feel like now?

Sherold:      It feels like zero.

Brad:          Awesome. Well done.

Sherold:      You know, as you were tapping, I started to feel better and better and better and better. I just thought, “Wow.” I never even intended that we would do this today. This is that little tiny girl that was so innocent.

You know, as you were saying, “And maybe this didn’t even really happen,” I mean, yeah. Who knows what really happened?

Brad:   There was nothing that was wrong with you as you crossed in front of that blue curtain.

Sherold:  Absolutely.

Brad:      Your brother’s sense of humor… brothers do stupid things. People in general do stupid things without realizing. There’s an expression: There’s nothing so cruel as an unthinking child.

Sherold:      Oh, that’s interesting.

Brad:          This is why I wrote a children’s book. I was working with all these adults and the things that were holding them back were things that happened in childhood. I thought to introduce this to kids. If that night, after you’d been booed off the stage —

Sherold:      Yes!

Brad:          If you had read this book and done some tapping…

Sherold:      It would have been a different scenario. I know. That’s so true.

This is such extraordinary work. I’m so happy to have had the opportunity to talk to you and to share this with my people because I would say to anyone listening this to go to your YouTube channel. I want to say that your website…

Brad:          I have a new website that’s easier to remember. TapwithBrad.com.

Sherold:      Do you still do private work if someone wanted to work with you on something?

Brad:          I still do a few sessions.

Sherold:     Okay, great. That’s how they can get ahold of you. Or they can go straight to your YouTube channel, which is fantastic I have to say.  Thank you so much for being with us today.

Brad:          My pleasure. Thank you for the opportunity.

If you liked this interview, share this with your friends or on social media.

Did you have a childhood experience where you felt ashamed, unworthy or not good enough that you tapped out?  I’d love to know in the comments.

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